One more time, with feeling.

I downloaded the iPhone app Weddar yesterday.

It’s a cute application that seeks to crowdsource the weather in the area that you’re in. It’s not about meteorological fact (22°C, 6mph Westerly wind, 78% humidity etc), but about how the weather is perceived.

Weddar: how does it feel?

I’m struck by the simplicity of its question, and the basic idea behind it: reporting on how it ‘feels’ is quietly brilliant. How does it feel?

Post Future-O-Matic.

A year ago, Russell posted his sketch for the Future-o-Matic Theory Maker.

Future-o-Matic; Russell Davies.

I think at the moment, there is little need for any column except the second one. I have noticed quite a lot of Peak Slow and Post Long recently. These are mostly as attempts to mediate content overload, such as the trend towards #longreads in blog posts and Russell’s own reshaping of Interesting this year.

Of course, the Big Dark is never far away.

Dropping balls.

I don’t use Google Chrome.

I’m told I should, but I don’t really want my entire internet experience mediated through Google (despite perversely sitting here using a MacbookPro laptop and Safari browser).

However, Google Creative Labs are doing some fantastic things to demonstrate the capabilities of their browser.  I’m feeling lucky

Help: Helsing’s Fire.

Hello. I need your help. Recently, I have been playing the wonderfully Victorian, macabre and tricky iPhone game Helsing’s Fire (iTunes link).

It is an excellent take on the German board game Waldschattenspiel (lit. “forest shadow play”), which uses tealights and triangular trees to defeat dwarves. Tom Armitage elicited many coos about it at Interesting North. It looks bloody marvellous, but apparently isn’t that great fun to play. in the shadows.

Decency in Strategy.

This post was originally titled “Is there a place in Carcassonne for people like Frankie Roberto?”

Frankie has adopted a hyper-aggressive form of Carcassonne. He plays tiles usually for the detriment of his opponents, rather than the betterment of his own hand. He enjoys nothing more than scoring a giant X onto the game board, scuppering towns or roads.

March forward, Orangemen.